BONE HEALTH

BONE HEALTH

Maintaining the equine skeleton in optimal condition is vital in order to ensure proper development of the young, growing horse, minimize risk of injury in the performance horse, and promote longevity and soundness throughout the horse's life.

Strength of bone is derived from a mineralized cartilage framework. Bone is a dynamic tissue and is therefore responsive to forces placed upon it. Bone also responds to changes in the amounts and ratios of calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium in the horse's diet. In addition, copper, zinc, manganese, vitamins A and D, and other nutrients have significant effects on bone development.

If the horse is fed a well-balanced and well-fortified diet, the largest single factor affecting bone strength is exercise. The remodeling of bone in response to exercise involves removing bone cells through the work of osteoclasts (cells that break down bone so that it can remodel and heal in response to stress and growth) and then building bone by osteoblasts (cells that make the cartilage matrix and are eventually mineralized).

Horses that do not receive free-choice exercise, such as those on stall rest or those managed in a stabled environment (show horses and racehorses), can be prone to demineralization of bone. This is especially common in young horses undergoing the transition from significant turnout to minimal or no turnout upon entering training.

Which solution is right for your horse?

DuraPlex®. Bone mineralization supplement. Ideal for horses who spend the bulk of their time stabled, including those transitioning to a management program that includes significant time spent stabled, those undergoing a convalescent period (lay-ups), and those that have sustained a bone injury or recovering from surgery. 

EO•3. Omega-3 supplement. Ideal to promote bone health in performance horses that are consuming diets likely to provide a greater intake of omega-6 fatty acids than omega-3 fatty acids. Specifically DHA and EPA supplementation has been shown to reduce inflammation with osteoarthritis.

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